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Brain-Injury Survivor: The Bizarre Tale Of Phineas Gage

Brain-Injury Survivor: The Bizarre Tale Of Phineas Gage

There are a lot of stories about freak accidents where people were horribly injured and on death’s doorstep but miraculously managed to survive. One among such dreadful events is, “American Crowbar case”. This accident took place on September 13, 1948. Phineas Gage, a railroad foreman, was the victim of this massive accident, which happened due to an explosion, a filling iron rod went straight through his head. However, he was fortunate enough to not have been killed by an attack like that.

Phineas GagePhineas Gage

In 1848, Gage, 25, was the foreman of a crew cutting a railroad bed in Cavendish, Vermont. On September 13, as he was using a tamping iron to pack explosive powder into a hole, the powder detonated. The tamping iron—43 inches long, 1.25 inches in diameter and weighing 13.25 pounds—shot skyward, penetrated Gage’s left cheek, ripped into his brain and exited through his skull, landing several dozen feet away. Though blinded in his left eye, he might not even have lost consciousness, and he remained savvy enough to tell a doctor that day, “Here is business enough for you.”

Gage’s initial survival would have ensured him a measure of celebrity, but his name was etched into history by observations made by John Martyn Harlow, the doctor who treated him for a few months afterward. Gage’s friends found him“no longer Gage,” Harlow wrote. The balance between his “intellectual faculties and animal propensities” seemed gone. He could not stick to plans, uttered “the grossest profanity” and showed “little deference for his fellows.” The railroad-construction company that employed him, which had thought him a model foreman, refused to take him back. So Gage went to work at a stable in New Hampshire, drove coaches in Chile and eventually joined relatives in San Francisco, where he died in May 1860, at age 36, after a series of seizures.

Brain-Injury Survivor: The Bizarre Tale Of Phineas GageSimulated Connectivity Damage of Phineas Gage

In time, Gage became the most famous patient in the annals of neuroscience, because his case was the first to suggest a link between brain trauma and personality change. In his book An Odd Kind of Fame: Stories of Phineas Gage, the University of Melbourne’s Malcolm Macmillan writes that two-thirds of introductory psychology textbooks mention Gage. Even today, his skull, the tamping iron and a mask of his face made while he was alive are the most sought-out items at the Warren Anatomical Museum on the Harvard Medical School campus.

source: www.smithsonianmag.com

Brain-Injury Survivor: The Bizarre Tale Of Phineas Gage
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