Archeology

Egyptian Archaeologists Discovered 7,000-Year-Old City

Archaeologists from the Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities have recently uncovered the remains of an ancient city, possibly dating back 7,000 years. The discovery included huts, pottery remains and iron tools as well as 15 massive graves.

The city was located near the Nile, in the vicinity of Seti I’s mortuary temple in Abydos.

Reserachers believe that the large size of the 15 recovered tombs points to a high social status of those buried. It is possible that the city was inhabited by high-ranking officials and grave builders, and was possibly blooming in the early era of ancient Egypt.

Egyptian Archaeologists Discovered 7,000-Year-Old City Photo:Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities
Egyptian Archaeologists Discovered 7,000-Year-Old City Photo:Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities

“The size of the graves discovered in the cemetery is larger in some instances than royal graves in Abydos dating back to the first dynasty, which proves the importance of the people buried there and their high social standing during this early era of ancient Egyptian history,” the ministry said.

The main discovery according to archeologists are unique artifacts unearthed at the site, among them foundations of ancient huts, iron tools and pottery, plus 15 giant tombs.

Egyptian Archaeologists Discovered 7,000-Year-Old City Photo:Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities

It’s though that the city was a home to well-established individuals and grave builders, who probably built royal tombs in nearby holy town of Abydos, which was the capital at the very beginning of Egyptian history, and where a number of temples are located.

The discovery was made close to the tomb of an ancient Egyptian pharaoh.

All Images©Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities

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Egyptian Archaeologists Discovered 7,000-Year-Old City
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